Thank you for considering a career with the Vermont Judiciary. The judicial branch is committed to a policy of equal employment opportunity, and the recruitment process is designed to treat all applicants equitably. The Judiciary will make no distinctions on the basis of age, sex, race, color, religion, national origin, sexual preference, or disabilities. The judicial branch will make reasonable accommodations to the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified applicant. The Judiciary is committed to maintaining a positive work environment that ensures all employees are treated with dignity, respect, and courtesy.

The Judicial Nominating Process

The Vermont Judicial Nominating Board recommends candidates to the governor to serve as Supreme Court justices, superior judges, magistrates, and members of the Public Service Board. More information about the Judicial Nominating Board, including its composition and purpose, can be found in Vermont Statutes Annotated, Title 4, Section 601.

The Judicial Election Process

Probate judges and assistant judges are elected by the citizens of Vermont. Candidates for the position of probate judge must have served as a judge or lawyer in the state for at last five of the last ten years. Assistant judges are not required to be lawyers. For more information about the electoral process, visit the Secretary of State's website.

Staff, Professional and Managerial Job Openings

The purpose of the recruitment process is to match the best-qualified person to a job so that the judicial branch is able to achieve its goals and objectives effectively and efficiently. The judicial branch publicizes vacancies to allow qualified applicants within and outside the court system to apply. The recruitment procedure will allow reasonable time for applications to be filed. General court positions use an online application process. To be considered for one of the positions listed, you must complete and submit the judicial branch employment application below.

Employment notices are published in PDF. You need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDF documents.

Appellate and Trial Court Law Clerks

Vermont trial court law clerks—both recent law school graduates and experienced practitioners— concentrate on legal research and writing for all judges of the civil, criminal, family, probate, and environmental divisions of the Superior Court on location throughout the state. They are hired initially for a one-year term, and there are opportunities for more senior and staff attorney positions. The annual recruitment typically occurs in the spring for positions starting the ensuing fall. The trial court law clerk job announcement, when available, is posted on the Staff, Professional and Managerial Job Openings page.

Supreme Court law clerks are hired directly by the justices. Announcements of openings are shared with accredited law schools throughout the nation and posted to the Vermont Judiciary's website. Supreme Court justices review application materials, interview the most qualified applicants by invitation, and make a final determination. Supreme Court law clerks are usually hired for a one-year term, but a justice may extend an invitation for an additional year.

Volunteer and Contractual Opportunities

The Judiciary offers contractual opportunities in support of court services such as mediation and volunteer positions in court programs that support Vermont's most vulnerable populations.

If you are interested in volunteer opportunities, please visit our Guardian ad Litem webpage.

If you are interested in providing mediation services, please visit our Family, Environmental, and/or Civil Mediation page(s).

Staff Position Descriptions

A job description captures the duties, required knowledge, skills and abilities, and minimum qualifications of Judiciary jobs. These descriptions of Judiciary jobs do not imply that the Judiciary is recruiting for that class. See the Staff, Professional & Managerial Job Openings for current opportunities.